Yarn sewing – APWQ http://apwq.org/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 20:55:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://apwq.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-29-120x120.png Yarn sewing – APWQ http://apwq.org/ 32 32 Industrial Sewing Thread Market Size Share, End User, Global Innovation Outlook to 2026 | Criterion Thread, Aurora, SENBAGAM TEXTILES, FUJIX https://apwq.org/industrial-sewing-thread-market-size-share-end-user-global-innovation-outlook-to-2026-criterion-thread-aurora-senbagam-textiles-fujix/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 01:44:36 +0000 https://apwq.org/industrial-sewing-thread-market-size-share-end-user-global-innovation-outlook-to-2026-criterion-thread-aurora-senbagam-textiles-fujix/ New Jersey, United States, – The global Industrial Sewing Thread market research report provides qualitative and quantitative information related to industry growth rate, market segmentation, Industrial Sewing Thread market size, demand and to income. Current trends that may affect the future prospects of the Drum Unloading Systems market will be analyzed in the report. The […]]]>

New Jersey, United States, – The global Industrial Sewing Thread market research report provides qualitative and quantitative information related to industry growth rate, market segmentation, Industrial Sewing Thread market size, demand and to income. Current trends that may affect the future prospects of the Drum Unloading Systems market will be analyzed in the report. The report examines and assesses the current environment of the ever-changing business sector and the current and future impact of covid-19 on the market.

The Global Industrial Sewing Thread Market 2021 study provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications, and industry chain structure. Global Industrial Sewing Threads Market report is provided for the international market as well as development trends, competitive environment analysis, and key regional development status. He discusses development policies and plans, and also analyzes manufacturing processes and cost structures.

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Overview of the Impact of Covid-19 on the Industrial Sewing Thread Market:

The emergence of COVID-19 has crippled the world. We understand that this health crisis has had an unprecedented impact on companies in the industry. But that will also pass. Increased support from governments and businesses can help fight this highly contagious disease. There are industries that are struggling and there are industries that are thriving. Overall, almost all sectors are expected to be affected by pandemics. We are committed to ensuring the sustainability and growth of your business during the Covid-19 epidemic. Our experience and expertise will help us prepare for the future by providing industry-wide impact analysis of coronavirus outbreaks.

The main players covered by the industrial sewing thread markets:

  • Criterion thread
  • Dawn
  • SENBAGAM TEXTILES
  • FUJIX
  • Ningbo SKYB THREAD INDUSTRY
  • Somac
  • Hubei Jiu Ding dyeing technology
  • HILCOSA
  • ROMATEX
  • Lianpac
  • Capital started
  • Shanghai? Yishi? Industrial
  • Elevate textiles

Segmentation of the industrial sewing thread market:

The Industrial Sewing Thread market is split by Type and by Application. For the period 2021-2028, the cross-industry growth provides accurate calculations and sales forecast by type and application in terms of volume and value. This analysis can help you grow your business by targeting qualified niche markets.

Industrial Sewing Threads Market Breakdown by Type:

Industrial Sewing Thread Market Split By Application:

  • Clothes
  • Furniture / Upholstery
  • Industrial lifting slings
  • Sport stuff
  • Others

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Scope of Industrial Sewing Threads Market Report

Report attribute Details
Market size available for years 2021 – 2028
Reference year considered 2021
Historical data 2015 – 2019
Forecast period 2021 – 2028
Quantitative units Revenue in millions of USD and CAGR from 2021 to 2027
Covered segments Types, applications, end users, etc.
Cover of the report Revenue forecast, company ranking, competitive landscape, growth factors and trends
Regional scope North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Middle East and Africa
Scope of customization Free customization of the report (equivalent to up to 8 working days for analysts) with purchase. Add or change the scope of country, region and segment.
Price and purchase options Take advantage of personalized shopping options to meet your exact research needs. Explore purchasing options

The analysis of the regional Industrial Sewing Thread Market can be represented as follows:

Each regional industrial sewing thread sector is carefully studied to understand its current and future growth scenarios. It helps the players to strengthen their position. Use market research to gain a better perspective and understanding of the market and target audience and ensure you stay ahead of the competition.

Basing on geography, the global industrial sewing thread market has segmented as follows:

    • North America includes the United States, Canada and Mexico
    • Europe includes Germany, France, UK, Italy, Spain
    • South America includes Colombia, Argentina, Nigeria and Chile
    • Asia-Pacific includes Japan, China, Korea, India, Saudi Arabia and Southeast Asia

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Visualize the Industrial Sewing Thread Market Using Verified Market Intelligence: –

Verified Market Intelligence is our BI platform for telling the story of this market. VMI provides in-depth predictive trends and accurate insights into over 20,000 emerging and niche markets to help you make key revenue impact decisions for a bright future. VMI provides a comprehensive overview and global competitive landscape by regions, countries and segments, as well as as key players in your market. Present your market reports and findings with built-in presentation capabilities, delivering over 70% of time and resources to investors, sales and marketing, R&D and product development. VMI supports data delivery in interactive Excel and PDF formats and provides over 15 key market indicators for your market.

Visualize the Industrial Sewing Thread Market Using VMI @ https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/mri-intelligence/

The study thoroughly explores the profiles of the major market players and their main financial aspects. This comprehensive business analysis report is useful for all new entrants and new entrants in designing their business strategies. This report covers the production, revenue, market share and growth rate of the Industrial Sewing Thread market for each key company, and covers the breakdown data (production, consumption, revenue and market share) by regions, type and applications. Historical industrial sewing thread distribution data from 2016 to 2020 and forecast to 2021-2029.

About Us: Market Research Intelligence

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Dilton Sewing Day helps refugee women https://apwq.org/dilton-sewing-day-helps-refugee-women/ Wed, 27 Oct 2021 10:00:50 +0000 https://apwq.org/dilton-sewing-day-helps-refugee-women/ Story published on October 27, 2021 A GROUP of local women from Dilton Marsh recently hosted a sewing day, making reusable sanitary napkins as part of a project to provide them to refugees. On behalf of the group, Sonja Harris said, “Sewing is said to mend the soul, and that was certainly the case at […]]]>

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A GROUP of local women from Dilton Marsh recently hosted a sewing day, making reusable sanitary napkins as part of a project to provide them to refugees.

On behalf of the group, Sonja Harris said, “Sewing is said to mend the soul, and that was certainly the case at Dilton Marsh on Saturday October 16th. Twenty-three women gathered in Memorial Hall, taking with them sewing machines, scissors, large quantities of fabric… and an iron and ironing board. The goal of the day was to make reusable sanitary napkins for the Pachamama project, which helps refugee women and girls escape menstrual poverty. Set up by two students from the University of Bristol during the Covid pandemic, the project focuses on providing health commodities to these vulnerable groups of women, many of whom arrive on foreign shores with nothing to their name.

“The Sewing Day was designed by Lynne Vercoe, who helped organize the Dilton Marsh Thread Bombs centered on Fairfield Farm College coffee. She felt that the village’s creative community could once again rise to the occasion, but this time turning to sewing rather than knitting for the benefit of the project. On Saturday, with volunteers from the village, Westbury, Upton Scudamore and beyond, Sally Esposito organized the women into groups of machinists, fabric cutters and ironers, not to mention the large refreshment crew.

“The project had provided templates for cutting the three different types of fabrics – anti-pilling fleece, fine terrycloth and cotton – and Sally had already composed several articles as examples. And so the production line started; the machines purred, the iron smoked and the scissors cut. A total of 90 sanitary napkins were produced that day, along with bags to hold the napkins, and the final number is likely to be higher as some women have taken the rest of the material kits to finish them at home. Feedback from the event has been very positive and it is expected that another Sewing Day will take place in due course.

“Thank you to everyone who volunteered; Tess, Sonja, Sally, Penny H, Penny B, Maureen, Helen, Helena, Caroline, Nadine, Linda, Enid, Eunice, Sue, Paula, Janet, Yvette, Ruth, Maeve, Serana, Jane, Menna and Debbie, and to those people who donated equipment and provided refreshments.

For more information on the Pachamama project and to see how you can get involved, visit: www.thepachamamaproject.org/


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Sewing Bee star Patrick Grant is developing a new textile ‘industry’ in Lancashire as part of the 2021 Textile Biennale https://apwq.org/sewing-bee-star-patrick-grant-is-developing-a-new-textile-industry-in-lancashire-as-part-of-the-2021-textile-biennale/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 16:08:00 +0000 https://apwq.org/sewing-bee-star-patrick-grant-is-developing-a-new-textile-industry-in-lancashire-as-part-of-the-2021-textile-biennale/ As part of the Lancashire-based British Textile Biennial 2021, which runs throughout October, work is underway on an unusual ‘HomeGrown / Homespun’ exhibition. The exhibit and associated exhibit have its origins in a field of flax and pastel cultivated earlier this year on disused land in Blackburn. This provided the thread to create the first […]]]>

As part of the Lancashire-based British Textile Biennial 2021, which runs throughout October, work is underway on an unusual ‘HomeGrown / Homespun’ exhibition.

The exhibit and associated exhibit have its origins in a field of flax and pastel cultivated earlier this year on disused land in Blackburn. This provided the thread to create the first Homegrown / Homespun garment for Patrick Blackburn’s social enterprise Community Clothing. He founded Community Clothing to sell sustainable and ethical men’s and women’s clothing and to create jobs.

The project is being carried out in collaboration with the North West England Fibreshed and the organizers of the Super Slow Way festival and the work could be seen in progress last week at the Blackburn Museum and Art Gallery. The fabric will still be prepared at the museum and gallery on Saturday afternoon, although it is now known that more linen will need to be grown to create a complete garment.

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Patrick grant

Patrick, who is currently filming the latest series of The Great British Sewing Bee, said: “It’s such a simple idea: the people of Blackburn are going to reclaim disused urban spaces and on them they will grow linen and pastel, we will make linen and indigo, and from there, we will make clothes, in a fully sustainable natural system. And in doing so, we will create new habitats for wildlife, soil systems will be regenerated, and we hope that hundreds, if not thousands, of people will engage with nature in a meaningful and positive way. It’s incredibly exciting. “

He predicted that Homegrown / Homespun will have: “Considerable benefits for the environment and nature, for the health and cohesion of the local community, and for the stimulation of a local green economy.

An exhibition on the culture and manufacturing process of linen will continue at the Blackburn Museum and Art Gallery until the end of the year.

Patrick is a long-time supporter of the local textile industry and the British Textile Biennial and has been a patron of the Biennale which he has supported since its inception.

Lubaina Himid pictured during her exhibition at the Great Barn at Gawthorpe Hall Photo: Huckleberry Films

The star judge of the Great British Sewing Bee TV show stepped in and, along with his sister Victoria, saved the historic Blackburn-based Cookson & Clegg in 2016.

Meanwhile, the Biennale, now in its third year, has revealed plans to expand further across Lancashire. It has its roots in East Lancashire, but this year there was to be an exhibition at the Harris Museum and Art Gallery in Preston, but this had to be moved to Blackburn due to Harris being closed for his Reimagining the Harris redevelopment .

Laurie Peake, director of Super Slow Way festival organizers, said: “We will continue to work with Preston certainly for 2023 and the intention is to roll out the Biennale across the county, especially for 2025. We have expanded to Rossendale this year – Lancashire is home to the textile industry, we thought if anyone were to organize a Textile Biennale, they absolutely should be here. “

Over the years, the buildings used for the Biennale have ranged from disused and vacant mills to mill museums and the Blackburn Cotton Exchange. Laurie said: “It’s about celebrating history, but also its contemporary heritage. Most of the people who live here actually came here because of the textile industry, no matter how many generations ago. . “

She noted that in the 1880s four towns in Lancashire supplied 85 percent of the world’s cotton products.

In comparison, nowadays only a few textile manufacturers remain in East Lancashire and manufacture fabrics ranging from specialty upholstery textiles to high-end designer fabrics.

An installation by UCLan professor and Turner Prize-winning artist Lubaina Himid is on display at the Great Barn at Gawthorpe Hall as part of this year’s Biennale. For more information on the exhibition, see our recent report here.

Meanwhile, textile historian Amber Butchart has curated a new Cloth Cultures exhibition at the Haworth Art Gallery, Accrington, which draws on objects from the Gawthorpe Hall Textile Collection.

For more details on the Biennale, see here.

* The Lancashire Post is more dependent than ever on your digital subscription to support our journalism. For more details on our October special and unlimited access to Lancashire news and information online, you can sign up here.


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Sarah Tyler teaches sewing skills to children and sets an example for them https://apwq.org/sarah-tyler-teaches-sewing-skills-to-children-and-sets-an-example-for-them/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://apwq.org/sarah-tyler-teaches-sewing-skills-to-children-and-sets-an-example-for-them/ There are parents who complain about volunteering at school. Then there are the parents who redouble their efforts, taking on roles on campuses where their children have never enrolled. Sarah Tyler has stepped in as an individual PTA in unrelated schools as a parent, acting as a liaison with administrators to uncover specific needs and […]]]>

There are parents who complain about volunteering at school. Then there are the parents who redouble their efforts, taking on roles on campuses where their children have never enrolled.

Sarah Tyler has stepped in as an individual PTA in unrelated schools as a parent, acting as a liaison with administrators to uncover specific needs and rally neighborhood volunteers.

In the Spring Branch area, where parent volunteerism can be unevenly distributed between neighborhood pockets and zip codes, she says, she wants to help where she sees a need.

Stephanie Hruzek is the Executive Director of FamilyPoint Resources, where Tyler is a long-time volunteer. FamilyPoint offers a community library, after-school program, and other enrichment services to help break cycles of poverty. Tyler has helped in a variety of ways, from finding masks for the kids to one-on-one homework help.

“She loves getting to know each child and their story,” says Hruzek. Tyler is “always super positive and encouraging. She’s the greatest cheerleader.

Through his volunteer work, Tyler hears about needs that go beyond FamilyPoint, Hruzek says. She has already watched Tyler take the initiative to meet with the principal of a nearby elementary school to find out how the community could better support the school.

To donate or volunteer with the non-profit FamilyPoint Resources community center, visit familypointresources.com.


“She is a great spokesperson and connector to the community,” says Hruzek. “She is good at amplifying this need and encouraging other neighbors to support it.”

About five years ago, Tyler helped start a sewing club at FamilyPoint. She began by soliciting donations of six sewing machines. Then she gathered volunteer instructors who also brought fabric.

After the children in the program learned basic sewing skills, they learned how to make drawstring bags and stuffed animals.

The sewing program has been a success, says Hruzek, and it continues to be a popular draw at summer camps and after school.

“Some kids only come for the sewing club,” she laughs, adding that the students have mastered sewing pajama pants, shoulder bags and office organizers.

Once during summer camp, a camper wore a skirt with a ripped frill. An instructor pointed to it as a way for the girl to use her new sewing skills.

“On the last day of camp, she wore the same skirt again,” Hruzek says. “She had sewn by hand and fixed the steering wheel. We were all in tears. “

The tailoring club offers a vital creative outlet, says Hruzek. “For a child’s imagination to take shape in a way that others can see, it gives them so much pride and confidence. “

“They think outside the box,” she says. A pillow project becomes a child’s desire to redecorate their room, she says, or fix things around the house.

“It’s kind of a domino effect” because children feel empowered, she says. “They carry all of these skills with them in all aspects of their lives. “

Tyler attracts volunteers to FamilyPoint because she finds her own charitable work rewarding, says Hruzek, gathering knowledge and “letting them know that every contribution is useful.”

She makes volunteer work “a lot of fun,” she says. “And it’s contagious.”

Tyler prioritizes other causes for children in his volunteer work.

She delivers meals for children’s meals, has worked for children’s advocates, and volunteers with The HAY Center, a Harris County resource for foster children.

His work with the HAY Center may consist of helping high school students apply for a job or exploring university applications and supporting them in their back-to-school purchases.

She has organized staff walks where the kids can pick out dresses, take makeup and dance lessons, and take home a bag of cologne and toiletries.

At Spring Branch Independent School District High School where Tyler’s three children attended, a rite of passage for graduates is to return to their elementary schools wearing their caps and gowns. Younger people make signs and line the hallways to encourage graduates, who wear T-shirts reflecting their acceptance into college or their postgraduate plans.


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6 simple hand-sewing projects you can do without a machine https://apwq.org/6-simple-hand-sewing-projects-you-can-do-without-a-machine/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://apwq.org/6-simple-hand-sewing-projects-you-can-do-without-a-machine/ Photo: [email protected]/ Photos deposit Contrary to what you might think about sewing, you don’t need a machine to create your crafty projects. A needle and thread are useful tools that, with a little time and patience, will have you doing everything from mending your clothes to making fun DIY projects. Whether you’re reattaching a button, […]]]>

Photo: [email protected]/ Photos deposit

Contrary to what you might think about sewing, you don’t need a machine to create your crafty projects. A needle and thread are useful tools that, with a little time and patience, will have you doing everything from mending your clothes to making fun DIY projects.

Whether you’re reattaching a button, mending a hole, or embarking on your first sewing project, learning the basics of hand sewing is essential. You’ll want to learn several stitches (it’s easy to do on YouTube), then take some thread or embroidery floss and practice on an old t-shirt.

Once you feel like you’ve mastered the basics, you’re ready to get creative. Scroll down for some handmade sewing inspiration.

Scroll down for the simple hand sewing projects that you’ll actually use.

Cookie Keychain

Follow this hands-on Chelsey DIY video to make your own fluffy cookie keychain. With a running stitch and simple embroidered “counters”, this project will be completed quickly. Gather some upholstery material and get ready for all the compliments on your new accessory.

Flannel hand warmer

Got an old flannel in your closet? Otherwise, buy a cheap one from a local thrift store. You’ll want to craft these soft hand warmers to keep you toasty warm when the temperature drops in the fall. Make them in pairs of two with these instructions from Sadie Seasongoods.

The filling is standard white rice. While the instructions say to use a machine, hand stitching the edges with a tight pass stitch is just as easy along these short appearances. These durable and recycled hand warmers also make great gifts for the family during the holidays.

Drawstring pouch

One of the best starter projects for beginner sewers is the simple drawstring pouch. Whether you are using a machine or sewing by hand, these bags can vary in size from tiny to huge. Use them to store everything from earrings to your delicate laundry. All you will need is two rectangular pieces of fabric of the same size or one large long piece that you will fold in half (this saves you from sewing the bottom seam). With thread, a needle and a cord, your bag will be complete. Watch this video from Din Life. Although there is no narration, the steps are intuitive and well illustrated.

Notebook covers

Felt is ideal for hand sewing. It’s sturdy, comes in bright colors, and is more compatible with wide and spaced stitches. Plus, it doesn’t fray.

Choose a sheet of felt and wrap it around your favorite notebook to gauge its size. Fabric covers often fit notebooks better with cardboard or other stiff material as a base. The felt should wrap around the vertical edges of the cover and extend two to three inches inside the book. Vertically, give yourself about an extra half inch of felt above and below the blanket. Take your needle and thread, preferably in a nice accent color. Use the blanket stitch to sew the felt flaps together above and below the blanket, creating two pockets that the blanket will slip into. The result is a whole new look for your laptop, like the ones created by Instagram user Kelly Hill.

Felt ornaments

Another felt hand sewing project is ornaments. These Christmas-themed crafts are accessible. Although hand sewing is more laborious, it allows for the addition of bead embellishments, sequins or other embroidered embellishments. This National Sewing Circle video is an ideal introduction to this project. From reindeer to mittens, your Christmas tree will be festive in felt.

Easy scrunchies

The scrunchie is another ’90s necessity that is making a comeback. For your fabric, choose shiny patterns or subtle tones, depending on your personal style. Using fabric, hair ties, needles and thread, work alongside YouTuber Sophie Li in her easy-to-follow video. Your darling will join the list of useful and stylish items that you have learned to sew by hand.

Hand sewing Easy to do yourself

Photo: LACIATEK / DepotPhotos

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Three Little Birds Sewing Co. moves to new location in Hyattsville https://apwq.org/three-little-birds-sewing-co-moves-to-new-location-in-hyattsville/ Tue, 07 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://apwq.org/three-little-birds-sewing-co-moves-to-new-location-in-hyattsville/ Three Little Birds Sewing Co. will move to a new, larger location in Hyattsville. After five years in its current space on Gallatin Street across from the Pyramid Atlantic Art Center, the sewing studio and craft supply store will be relocating a few blocks north of 5307 Baltimore Ave., to the strip of stores next […]]]>

Three Little Birds Sewing Co. will move to a new, larger location in Hyattsville.

After five years in its current space on Gallatin Street across from the Pyramid Atlantic Art Center, the sewing studio and craft supply store will be relocating a few blocks north of 5307 Baltimore Ave., to the strip of stores next door. by Yes! Organic market.

The new space is about three and a half times the size, allowing them to have a separate area for classes and their own free parking lot at the back of the building, owner Katie Blattner told the Hyattsville Wire.

Three Little Birds has also teamed up with one of its employees to open a small yarn shop featuring independent producers within the store called Sweet Pea Fiber, which will also run workshops and classes.

Rick Wilson Construction does the facade work while Green Owl Design, located two doors down, helps Blattner choose colors and work on additional design details for the store.

The store plans to have a grand opening at its new location later this month with a date to be announced, including freebies for free classes and even tickets to Hamilton.

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In quarantine on vacation. Nothing like safe travel with children during a pandemic https://apwq.org/in-quarantine-on-vacation-nothing-like-safe-travel-with-children-during-a-pandemic/ Sun, 05 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://apwq.org/in-quarantine-on-vacation-nothing-like-safe-travel-with-children-during-a-pandemic/ Kat Cosley and her family had flown about eight hours to Hawaii for a beach vacation, only to be locked in their hotel room by staff. Cosley’s family, along with others, have been quarantined on a hotel floor. She still can’t believe it happened. Like many parents across the country, Cosley and her husband, Frank […]]]>

Kat Cosley and her family had flown about eight hours to Hawaii for a beach vacation, only to be locked in their hotel room by staff.

Cosley’s family, along with others, have been quarantined on a hotel floor. She still can’t believe it happened.

Like many parents across the country, Cosley and her husband, Frank Trigg, had hoped normalcy was on the horizon in July. That the pandemic was over and that we would soon be moving around like we did before all of this.

The couple, who live in Katy, booked a nine-day trip to O’ahu to celebrate their 20th wedding anniversary with their two boys, Lathen, 5, and Frankie, 8, and Cosley’s mother, Margaret Cosley . The adults have been fully vaccinated; the boys were too young for the COVID-19 vaccine. Cosley said she followed protocol – uploaded their vaccination cards to Hawaii’s Safe Travels site, then made an appointment at a Walgreen store to have her children tested for COVID before the flight.

She couldn’t predict that Walgreen’s would run out of COVID testing, and she would be forced to rush her children to a reputable lab for the test just days before they left. The results were negative. But in Hawaii, authorities refused to accept the results, saying the test was not performed by a preferred supplier. The family were transported to their hotel, where they were quarantined in a downgraded room.

Cosley’s boys cried from the bedroom window, as they watched other children playing in the water outside. It’s mom’s worst failure, Cosley thought.

“The kids were so emotional. They didn’t understand why we had come all this way to be stuck in a hotel room. It was hard for everyone, but especially for the children, ”she said.

The next morning, Cosley and her husband spent an additional thousands of dollars on plane tickets for her and the boys to fly to Los Angeles for COVID testing, then return to Hawaii to recoup the remainder of the vacation.

The pandemic has made traveling, especially with young children, a monumental task. It’s not just about making sure they’re protected from germs, but also about being prepared for anything and everything to go wrong. Hawaii has the most stringent COVID entry requirements in the country under the Safe Travels program. To bypass a mandatory 10-day quarantine, travelers must show proof of vaccination or present a negative COVID-19 test from an approved provider, performed no later than three days before arrival.

“I was on top of everything,” Cosley said. “I had done my research and obtained the COVID tests in advance. From the moment I booked the tests it was all downhill from there. I’m thankful we had the money to fly to Los Angeles, but it was a lot.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends delaying travel until you are fully immunized. If you are traveling with children who cannot be vaccinated, consider safer travel options, such as shorter air trips and limiting their food and drink intake to keep their mask on.

Yet there is no such thing as a safe vacation during a pandemic.

Although my recent trip with my children was not affected by the COVID protocol, being in a crowded airport with two young children caused enough stress.

It was their first plane flight, just days before the outbreak of COVID-19 cases in early August. We were on our way to Atlanta and I was determined to make it work. I had done my research, like Cosley, and ordered some quality masks and face shields and packed enough wipes and hand sanitizer. I also booked toddler car seats at the Atlanta car rental company to avoid checking our car seats as luggage.

The airport was packed with travelers, toilets were closed in many areas, and a hamburger and three small bottles of water cost $ 50. When I got to the car rental company at midnight, the car seats, which I had confirmed would be suitable for my previous days of 3 and 5, were meant for babies. I had no choice but to drive an hour and a half to my friend’s house with my kids strapped in adult restraints in the back seat, holding my breath so I wouldn’t get pulled over by the police or end up in a car accident.

The next day, I quickly bought car seats from Walmart and filed a complaint with the car rental company, who reimbursed me.

“Parents have had the craziest year, and navigating the trip is no different,” said Kristin Finan, co-founder of Austin Travels Magazine. “I booked a bunch of trips because we were so excited to be back on a plane and then canceled them once the COVID cases increased. Restrictions and protocol change daily. I try to make good decisions and listen to my instinct to travel.

Finan and her husband, Patrick Badgley, took their six children – ages 12, 10, 9, 8, 6 and 5 – on a road trip in a rented campervan to the Grand Canyon in 2020 to avoid the stress of air travel.

“It’s impossible to predict what will happen when you travel with children during the pandemic. At least as parents we all know we’re in the same boat, ”she said.

Our trip to Atlanta was a necessary respite to connect with former colleagues, family and friends. After a year of social distancing, I needed this interaction, and the kids enjoyed it too. Still, I’m not eager to catch another plane anytime soon.

As Cosley put it, “I’m pretty smart and thought I was above everything. But the stress of making sure you’re doing everything to prepare for a trip with kids during a pandemic is too much. “

His advice and mine: don’t travel now.

joy.sewing@chron.com


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Sewing the Future: MakeIT Haverhill Offers Vocational Training for a Good Start | Haverhill https://apwq.org/sewing-the-future-makeit-haverhill-offers-vocational-training-for-a-good-start-haverhill/ Tue, 17 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://apwq.org/sewing-the-future-makeit-haverhill-offers-vocational-training-for-a-good-start-haverhill/ HAVERHILL – The rhythmic hum of sewing machines could signal the sounds of a better future for some residents of the Mount Washington neighborhood and other parts of the city. Residents seeking training as sewing machine operators can now attend free classes offered through a partnership between Urban Kindness – the Mount Washington neighborhood civic […]]]>

HAVERHILL – The rhythmic hum of sewing machines could signal the sounds of a better future for some residents of the Mount Washington neighborhood and other parts of the city.

Residents seeking training as sewing machine operators can now attend free classes offered through a partnership between Urban Kindness – the Mount Washington neighborhood civic improvement group led by Keith Boucher, and Community Action Inc. in Haverhill.

Their new MakeIT Haverhill, a nonprofit training center and manufacturing space on the corner of Bartlett and Washington Streets, is equipped with four Juki-branded industrial sewing machines donated by Southwick, which makes Brooks Brothers suits in a Broadway Business Park factory.

For Fior Daliza, who, along with her husband and their children, arrived in Haverhill earlier this year from the Dominican Republic, not speaking English has been a barrier to finding a good job.

In addition, she did not have many professional skills other than informal training in her native country in the use of a sewing machine.

Then she heard about the MakeIT center, where she is about to land a job in Southwick.

“I’ve been here four times so far and hope to learn enough to find a job,” she said through an interpreter – her son, Dauri DeLacruz, 13, a student at the Consentino school.

A ribbon cutting for the new center took place on June 14th and now participants are involved in learning new skills or improving the skills they already have.

Jan Williams of North Andover, Diane Boucher (Keith’s wife) and Helen Sheehan of Haverhill are the sewing machine instructors at the center.

Keith Boucher has said he hopes to place his first intern at Southwick in about a month. He said the company was very receptive to hiring people from different cultures.

“I met Southwick’s manufacturing manager, Curt Clark, who also provides us with technical support, sewing machine maintenance and fabric scraps for practice,” said Keith Boucher. “He also provided a training program so that the people we work with can find employment in Southwick, where they have a demand for sewing machine operators.”

For those interested in technology, the center has 14 laptops donated by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. Computers will soon be loaded with Microsoft Office applications. Training is expected to begin this fall.

State-of-the-art training in computer-aided design is another offering. Anything that is designed can be produced with the use of 3D printing technology. Chris White of CreatorPult, a creative space on Essex Street, donated three 3D printers to the center.

“CAD skills could be a career path to places like New Balance, which is opening a factory in Methuen and will include a design center for creating 3D printed shoes,” said Keith Boucher. “Southwick is also considering 3D printing for its operation.”

The center also has a 65-inch television and a 75-inch television for presentations, as well as a conference room for 10 people.

Angela Meade of Haverhill saw a poster at the public library for MakeIT Haverhill, where she took lessons on a sewing machine in hopes of learning enough to modify her own clothes.

“I would also like to be able to make my own clothes and maybe translate them into something profitable,” she said.

Keith Boucher has said he would like to start a collaborative sewing group that, as a first step, makes fabric grocery bags in place of the plastic bags now banned in Haverhill supermarkets.

He also plans to offer English lessons.

Keith Boucher bought the building, which he says was home to the Benedetti shoe store decades ago. He rents it to MakeIT Haverhill, a community action project.

Community Action and Urban Kindness are part of the Mount Washington Alliance, which received a $ 500,000 grant from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston a few years ago to improve the socio-economic situation of residents in this part of town.

“We are not a job placement service, but we help people get to where they want to go,” said Boucher.


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Rodef Shalom Sewing Group continues to sew for good https://apwq.org/rodef-shalom-sewing-group-continues-to-sew-for-good/ Mon, 02 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://apwq.org/rodef-shalom-sewing-group-continues-to-sew-for-good/ Nancy Rosenthal, Suzanne Gollin, Phyllis Klein and Caroline Liston sat in front of six Singer sewing machines in the Rodef Shalom Sisterhood room last Tuesday. While the gathering was a bit smaller than before the pandemic, Rosenthal said, it was wonderful to be together in person. For much of the past year, members of the […]]]>

Nancy Rosenthal, Suzanne Gollin, Phyllis Klein and Caroline Liston sat in front of six Singer sewing machines in the Rodef Shalom Sisterhood room last Tuesday. While the gathering was a bit smaller than before the pandemic, Rosenthal said, it was wonderful to be together in person.

For much of the past year, members of the Rodef Shalom Sisterhood Sewing Group have met on Zoom. Participants still sewed pieces for various charities, chatting and helping each other with difficult stitches, but digital encounters just weren’t the same. Rather than their usual two-hour in-person sessions, the virtual meetings lasted only 60 minutes. And it wasn’t that easy to set up a sewing machine and focus on the job while using Zoom, Rosenthal said.

“Being able to really be with each other is a whole different experience,” she said. Now that the group has been back together in person for almost a month, “we can help each other a little bit more.”

During last week’s session, Rosenthal and her peers cut fabric, sewn pieces and affixed buttons to make tea towels. Some members also made colorful plush clowns.

The types of items created depend on the needs, explained Rosenthal. Sometimes the group makes blankets, sometimes hats, other times children’s rompers. There were times when the group even made headgear for cancer patients.

Wire. Photo by Adam Reinherz

The congregation’s sewing group dates back 115 years and “was one of the original committees established at the fellowship’s first organizing meeting in 1906,” according to Martha Berg, archivist for Rodef Shalom.

Early documents indicate that the sewing committee – it was later renamed the Rodef Shalom Sisterhood sewing group – purchased its first sewing machine in June 1906. Berg assumes it was a pedal machine because in 1908, the head of the sewing committee reported the purchase of an electric motor for his machine.

Caroline Liston of Penn Hills recalls joining the group over 40 years ago.

“I was very young and it was a wonderful way to plan my week away from two kids,” she said. “It was relaxing. “

Liston, 74, said when she and a friend started attending the weekly meetings, they added some diversity to the longtime cohort.

“We have cut the average age in half,” she said, adding that she enjoyed being around older women because they had experienced interesting times and were able to offer perspectives and insights. unique ideas.

Phyllis Klein’s family has been linked to Rodef Shalom for more than seven decades. Klein, a resident of Swiss Elm Park, remembers her mother’s neighbors coming to the sewing group years ago.

“After a while I decided as a member to find out what it was about,” Klein said.

What she discovered almost eight years ago was a friendly group of women who also enjoyed doing things for others, she said.

This charitable commitment has been at the heart of the group’s mission for more than a century, said Berg.

In 1920, the Sewing Committee made 699 garments which were scattered among the Gusky Orphanage, Jewish Baby Home, Temporary Children’s Home, Zoar Home, Pittsburgh Baby Home, Red Cross, Hadassah , Erie Orphanage, Irene Kaufmann Institution, United Hebrew Relief, Montefiore Hospital, Pittsburgh Association for the Improvement of the Poor, and individuals. A few years later, a subcommittee of the sewing committee established what was called the ‘Cutout for the Blind’, where members cut up towels, aprons and other items, and delivered them to workshop for the blind to have them completed, Berg added.

Nancy Rosenthal, left, delivers a plush clown and tea towel to Elaine Rybski in the Rodef Shalom gift shop. Photo by Adam Reinherz

Over the years, the sewing group has received countless donations of thread, fabric, thread, pins, needles and scissors, said Susanne Gollin, 67, of Highland Park Gollin.

Members of Rodef Shalom’s sewing group attend to each week with an abundance of supplies and a firm commitment to helping those in need. There are enough supplies, organized on shelves and in lockers throughout Rodef Shalom’s Sisters’ Hall, to allow the group to continue making a plethora of items that can be donated for the foreseeable future.

Elaine Rybski, director of Rodef Shalom Gift Corner, assigned members of the sewing group to supply many items currently in the store, including baby blankets, knitted aprons and hats.

It’s an impressive collection, said Rybski, and the sale of the items generates thousands of dollars for Rodef Shalom projects, including congregational picnics, educational efforts and social justice initiatives.

Rosenthal said she is proud of what the group has achieved, both recently and throughout their history, but hopes it will have an even bigger impact.

“We need more people to volunteer and come and donate their skills,” she said. “There is a great need for people who have nothing. PJC

Adam Reinherz can be contacted at areinherz@pittsburghjewishchronicle.org.


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China’s CISMA 2021 to showcase innovations in the sewing industry https://apwq.org/chinas-cisma-2021-to-showcase-innovations-in-the-sewing-industry/ Fri, 30 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://apwq.org/chinas-cisma-2021-to-showcase-innovations-in-the-sewing-industry/ China International Sewing Machine and Accessories Exhibition (CISMA) 2021, to be held in Shanghai from September 26-29, 2021, will serve as a platform to showcase industrial progress and innovations to the global sewing industry. It will lead all sewing companies to focus on coordinated growth, follow development trends and meet the needs of downstream users. […]]]>
China International Sewing Machine and Accessories Exhibition (CISMA) 2021, to be held in Shanghai from September 26-29, 2021, will serve as a platform to showcase industrial progress and innovations to the global sewing industry. It will lead all sewing companies to focus on coordinated growth, follow development trends and meet the needs of downstream users.

Organized by the China Sewing Machinery Association (CSMA), the event will be held at the Shanghai New International Expo Center (SNIEC).

The theme of CISMA 2021 is “Smart Manufacturing, Enabling Intelligence and Gathering Wisdom” and aims to drive digital and intelligent upgrade. It also aims to improve the competitiveness of the sewing industry in order to gain the upper hand on the global stage and further contribute to China’s manufacturing power strategy, CSMA Deputy General Manager Yang Xiaojing said at the meeting. ‘a press conference.

Xiaojing added that thanks to the concerted efforts of the entire industry, the 13e five-year plan has been successfully completed, and they are now moving towards achieving the 14e five-year plan.

The event will also showcase new technology equipment and applications and help the industry know how to turn scientific achievements into solutions, CSMA Secretary General Chen Ji said. CISMA 2021 would present a wide range of smart achievements and technical solutions, which could help downstream users to solve problems such as cost reduction and efficiency improvement, quality assurance, meeting specific needs customers, facilitating digital transformation.

Fibre2Fashion Information Office (KD)

The China International Sewing Machinery & Accessories Show (CISMA) 2021, which will be held in Shanghai from September 26-29, 2021, will serve as a platform to showcase industrial advancements and innovations to the global sewing industry. It will lead all sewing companies to focus on coordinated growth, follow development trends and meet the needs of downstream users.


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